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Posted by Racialicious Team

If you missed our first call, don’t sweat — we’re still looking to hear from any creators of color heading to San Diego Comic-Con next week.

To recap: If you’re going to be an exhibitor or presenter during the convention, or know someone who is, drop us a line in the comment thread here, or at team@racialicious.com and we’ll boost the signal as part of our SDCC preview, which will also our looks at the programming. Just let us know where to find you both at the event and online.

Also, stick around during the con, as Kendra & Arturo bring you live-tweets and images throughout the weekend!

Top image by Kevin Dooley via Flickr Creative Commons

The post Last Call For The Racialicious SDCC Creators Of Color Round-up appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

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Posted by Guest Contributor

By Guest Contributor John Sims

We live in troubled times. This story started many scores of years ago with the founding fathers, some of whom may have recognized the toxic contradictions that would poison the future of this great land. Our history reveals constant resistance to social justice and respect: the sabotage/abandonment of Reconstruction, the compromised Civil Rights Movement, thwarted Black Power, silenced affirmative action, with countless lynchings, injustices, and instances of police and state brutality along the way. We are in haunted times, where race and Blackness are debated and presented with sleight of hand, tricking our best minds to think we are in a post-Black/racial epoch. We are in war times: white supremacy, privilege and denial on one side, black poverty, mass incarceration, double-consciousness on the other. Welcome to an American Civil War that started long before General Lee was born.

The wounds of the Civil War continue to sting after 150 years, along the lines of geography, race, and regional heritage, compromising national healing and sometimes civility. In the late 1990s in South Carolina, tensions flared over the placement of the Confederate flag on the capitol dome. Mass demonstrations and counter-demonstrations across the South revealed deep rifts in the reading of the Civil War and its aftermath, how greatly divided we really are as a country, and how this war continues.

In war, flags are important signifiers that mark social, cultural and historical space. While some may believe the Confederate flag is about heritage and not hate, its history and present reality speak otherwise. This flag can never represent the rich diversity and dynamic heritage of Southern folk, where the African American experience has played a central role. To continue to fly this flag is more than passive-aggressive and disrespectful; it promotes visual terrorism. If Black people and sympathetic allies are not in constant resistance and protest of such symbols, we run the risk of sending the wrong signal: that everything is fine and that we don’t matter. So we protest.

If we cannot resolve the issue of the Confederate flag, something we can see and touch, how can we as a nation process the complex things we cannot see? There are cemeteries for Confederates soldiers; where are the national memorials to the victims of slavery, to descendants of African slaves who built the economy that made this country a world power? What can we make of the fact that in WWII, white American soldiers often treated Nazi prisoners of war better than their African American compatriots? The Confederate flag flying, the Fergusons, the Eric Gardners, and the Freddie Grays of America are forceful reminders of this nation’s consistent lack of respect for Black people. And where there is no respect, there is no justice, and there can be no peace.

“Recoloration Proclamation” and “#BuryBuryFlag Artist John Sims.

To mark both the 150th anniversary of the end of Civil War and the conclusion of Recoloration Proclamation (my fifteen-year multi-media art project concerned with the Confederate flag, visual terrorism and the ownership of Southern heritage), I organized The Confederate Flag: 13 Flag Funerals. This was a funeral/burial group performance in each of the 13 states represented by the 13 stars on the Confederate flag. These events, held on Memorial Day, May 25, 2015, were intended to create a space of ceremonial reflection on the desire for the death, burial, and perhaps the burning of all the Confederate flag represents: a symbol of terror, treason, supremacy, a bearer of the message that history is rewriteable, visual terrorism is sustainable and Black Lives Don’t Matter.

Then weeks later, South Carolina happened.

Contrary to much media reporting, this incident is far from unbelievable. It is a product of American racism. The time is now for the Confederate flag to come down in South Carolina, Mississippi, and other places where it flies high. The time is now for federal law prohibiting the use of the Confederate flag in state flags or on governmental property. The time is now to demand that taking the flag down be more than a mere consolation prize, for the time is now to address head on the foundational issues that undermine social justice and respect for all Americans.

The Confederate Flag: A Call to Burn and Bury. Courtesy John Sims.

The Confederate Flag: A Call to Burn and Bury. Courtesy John Sims.

So in response to Charleston as an artist and concerned citizen, I am extending the 13 Flag Funerals Memorial Day project to a countrywide call for the collective burning and burying of the Confederate flag on July 4th, 2015. I am asking all Americans to join together on Independence Day to demonstrate that this symbol of slavery, segregation, subjugation, and a lost war will not divide us further and that the this great American Civil War must come to an end.


John Sims is a multi-media political math artist who creates projects spanning the areas of mathematics, art, text, performance, and political-media activism.  #BurnBuryFlag

The post Art as Remembrance and Creative Resistance: John Sims’ Flag Funerals appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

Skeletons in the Net

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 01:50 pm
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Posted by admin

Andrew Keen takes on the Internet on technological and economic grounds, arguing it promotes monopoly and authoritarianism

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The internet is not the answer Andrew Keen Atlantic Monthly Press | 2885 pages | Rs 800

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Strengthening the roots

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 01:49 pm
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Tribal leadership nurtured by grassroots organisations in Chhattisgarh is helping people access rights and entitlements

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Neem-coated growth

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 01:26 pm
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The Union government's decision to produce neem-coated urea will not only improve soil health and agriculture, but also halt its illegal diversion to industry

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Finally, a US revolt on drug price

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 01:26 pm
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Posted by Latha Jishnu

American legislators are trying to enact new laws to force the pharma industry to explain pricing of specialty drugs

imageGilead sciences became the poster boy for high drug prices when it launched Sovaldi to treat hepatitis C, a course of treatment that cost US $84,000, or US $1,000 a pill. That shocked the world. There was outrage even in the developed world which has always defended the high prices charged by innovator companies as the cost of encouraging R&D and bringing new drugs to the market.

The labyrinth of desire

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 01:26 pm
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Posted by Rakesh Kalshian

A female equivalent of Viagra has once again rekindled our interest in the female libido

imageFor over a decade and a half, Viagra has helped revive the flagging sexual careers of many an impotent man. Buoyed by its soaring success (it raked in US $1.7 billion in 2014), modern-day druids have been trying to brew a potion that would likewise give back a woman her lost mojo.

Taste the Himalayas

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 01:25 pm
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The leaves of faran have a distinct fragrance and are of high medicinal value

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food

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In April, the police had opened fire on villagers peacefully protesting at the dam site

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The Uttar Pradesh police on Tuesday arrested the general secretary of All India Union of Forest Working People (AIUFWP), Roma Malik, from Sonebhadra district in Uttar Pradesh for leading a protest against the Kanhar dam project.

Let the Sangai dance

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 12:46 pm
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A critically endangered brow-antlered deer found in the world's only floating wildlife park in Manipur may soon lose its habitat

Moirangtham Ranjit

New meat culture

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 12:45 pm
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Engineered meat is peeping out of the labs

Mark Post's engineered beef burger (above) was priced at US $325,000In August 2013, Mark Post of Maastricht University served two lab-made beef patties at a much-publicised event in London. Post created the pieces of meat for an astounding US $325,000 each. It was later revealed that the secret funder of the project was Google co-founder, Sergey Brin.

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Dependence on one’s own fields for wheat has reduced with rural households consuming only 29 per cent of total cereals from home-grown stocks

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New data released by the National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO) shows that rural India buys more than 70 per cent of its total cereal requirement directly from the open market and public distribution system (PDS) shops. The numbers have not changed since the last survey in 2009-10.

Ebola returns to Liberia

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 12:31 pm
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Liberia reported maximum deaths in the present outbreak of the disease

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Fifty-one days after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared Liberia Ebola-free, at least two new cases have of the deadly disease have emerged in the West African nation.

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Its policy of equitable, accessible and universal healthcare ensured easy access to care by pregnant women and children

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Cuba has become the first country in the world to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis. The World Health Organization (WHO) validated Cuba’s achievement on Tuesday.

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Posted by Guest Contributor

By Guest Contributor DJ Kuttin Kandi

Nearly 20 years after the film Nobody Knows My Name by documentarian Rachel Raimist many of us can still relate to the many stories of the wom*n in Hip Hop that were told in the film. We, the Anomolies crew can most definitely relate as we are just a few of the thousands upon thousands of names you never knew existed.

Anomolies originally started off as an “all female Hip Hop” collective back in 1995 with over 26 members. In the last few years, we have evolved to be inclusive to being a gender justice collective. So, we don’t appreciate the assumptions and the misgendering of any of our crew members. We came together to create a safe space for ourselves within Hip Hop so that we can be all that we are and do what we love without having to worry about ridicule, judgement and overall oppression that many of us so often receive within many patriarchal-dominated Hip Hop spaces. Anomolies’ intentional goal was to support one another and to offer our support to many of us within Hip Hop who are so often marginalized and underrepresented. We started Anomolies because we knew that we had to be our own agents of change because if we didn’t, who else would?

The dictionary definition of the name aNoMoLIES is 1. To deviate from the norm. or 2. Something that occurs once in a lifetime. When you break down the name it spells out No Mo Lies (no more lies). Anomolies dispels myths about our identities in Hip Hop culture. We are proud to deviate from the “norm”, we are proud to question and to challenge myths.

Beyond our own Hip Hop crew, so many of us are Anomolies — trying to break gender norms, defying myths and trying to use Hip Hop as a platform to be heard.

So many of us are local to global wom*n-identified, wom*n of color, black and brown bodies, indigenous, queer, trans, two-spirited, gender non-conforming, disabled, adoptees, (im)migrants, non-working to working class Hip Hop artists and communities that you never knew had skills. So many are the voices that many have never heard of because either they are pretending we don’t exist or they are pretending to be us. We’re either the ones many want to “rachelize” or we’re the ones they want to call “old skool” b*tches and not give us our due props. We’re the ones you would never know about until an actor like Shia LaBeouf shows up on video footage somewhere in the woods reciting some of our verses from one of our songs and “fake the funk” like he was actually freestyling.

But we are more than just any of this …

We are more than just rappers/lyricists/battle mc’s, DJs & turntablists, producers, graffiti writers, and Bgirlz. We are more than just “independent Hip Hop”. We’re not just from that “true hip hop” cypher we so often call the “underground”. No, we are more than just all this …

Because we also practice the 5th element of Hip Hop which is knowledge, we’ve got knowledge of self. Because we have knowledge of self we know our roots and where we come from. We know the realities of the world and we are aware of the struggles that we face. We are conscious and because of this consciousness we know that even as I write this, many will still never know our name or care about us.

Because we are the marginalized, underrepresented, and the oppressed; we know that many will never know what it feels like to have been around for more than 2 decades to then have a few of our lyrics which was written and recorded in 1999 to be used in a cypher by a famous white cisgender-male privileged famous actor like Shia LaBeouf as though he “freestyled” it himself. We know that many will not even care to understand what it’s like to be attacked by random people defending his “freestyle” by calling us “b*tches” and to tell us that he was doing us a favor by biting our verses. We know that many will tell us it was only a few bars and that we should move on but yet only true Hip Hop heads will know this is disrespect. We know that many will not know what it feels like to now have white amerikkka watching over us and reaching out to our personal lives just to attack us with misogynist threats and even our children just because we were trying to speak up for ourselves. Because we are from the “underground” and are about that “true Hip Hop” we know that Hip Hop has reached suburb America into white backpacker homes who all love to rap Hip Hop, BE Hip Hop, and be us but yet never want to BE us.

Because we are all Anomolies and nobody knows our names – we know that after the buzz feeds and hashtags fades away, we will once again be forgotten and only those of us who truly know and love Hip Hop Culture; will continue to salute and honor us. We know that after all is said and done; we will continue to feel unsafe and unprotected as many will continue to troll the feeds with their racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, ableist and overall oppressive comments just to protect the Rachel Dolezal’s, Iggy Izalea’s and Shia LaBeouf’s of the world – because we are the often imitated, the often erased, and the often oppressed.

But it had been our dearest friend, black lesbian feminist Audre Lorde that has taught us that our silence will not protect us. While some of us may not call ourselves feminists, some of us know that it is because of Audre Lorde that we know that Anomolies is our form of feminism. In the troubled times that we are currently facing and have been facing — from continuously being sexually assaulted, raped, harassed, to Rachel Dolezal’s blackface to Ferguson and to Charleston, to the hurtful attacks against Jennicet for demanding that trans women be released from detention centers – we know that now is not the time to retreat and be afraid of our rage for we know that our silence will not save us.

So, while to some this is just “Hip Hop” and a few bars off our track the “Perfectionist”, to so many of us this means so much more — for Anomolies is our family. nomolies is our ANSwer to speaking truth to power. We’re not here to do anything but to speak our truth because we know that this is bigger than us. We know that all this will just come and go, so we really don’t have time to continuously check the privileges of white cisgendered men of mainstream America because there are far more relevant issues going on in the world. We’ve got work to do and we are working hard to get more organized. As we organize, we know that we need to say our names and say it loud for we are proud to be more than just your average “norm”.

We are not the first to have our music and lyrics bitten, we are not the first to have our h*stories and our lives erased, nor are we the first to be culturally appropriated. But we know we at least said something and did something. We called out whom we needed to call out. We are done.

The rest is up to you all —- We are NOT going to do interviews on this subject because we got work to do. So, we’re going to let our media justice friends do that, should it be done. Btw, a big shout out to all of our fans/supporters/families who all brought this to our attention and who have had our back in responding to all this unnecessary business.

If any of you all wanna continue supporting — then support our work, support our lives, support our movement, support organizations that are doing grassroots gender rights work, call out those only all male hip-hop line ups, buy our music because some of us pay our rents and feed our families with all this, organize in your community, speak out against gender injustice when it needs to be called out — if you don’t know, then learn — not just about Anomolies but support all wom*n, wom*n of color, queer, trans and gender non-conforming with all shapes and sizes, (dis)abilities and ages. Don’t wait for us till we’re no longer here. Do this now —- for again, this is bigger than us — this is not for some “spotlight”. 20 years later you think we care about all that? Nah —- THERE ARE IMPORTANT STRUGGLES GOING ON IN THIS WORLD, we don’t got time for this unwanted attention based off of Shia LaBeouf. SO LET’S ORGANIZE. This is all that is asked to be done to speak and say our names — all of us from the “underground” to all over this world. Say that we are here … speak our names into existence for we are more than just the Anomolies… we are the family you never knew existed.

DJ Kuttin Kandi is a member of the Anomolies hip-hop collective, as well as a poet and activist.

The post On Shia LaBeouf And Appropriation: This Is What Happens When Nobody Knows Your Name appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

Collision recourse

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 10:33 am
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Posted by admin

Mammoth experiments are under way to test various theories on particle physics

SECOND WATCH: ALICE Run Control Centre during the first 13 TeV proton collisions with stable beams, on June 3.

Back, again!

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 10:33 am
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Over 80 per cent of India's population suffers from at least one episode of back pain in their lifetime. New research links back pain to the shape of the vertebra

The study found a positive correlation between the shape of the vertebra and Schmorl's node, which is an indicator of a spinal abnormality— intervertebral disc herniation

Science & Technology - Bytes

Wednesday, 1 July 2015 10:33 am
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Oxygen and climate change

New research throws light on a less studied subject

imageOXYGEN IS not a greenhouse gas and that's why it has not been studied in the context of climate change.

The proportion of atmospheric oxygen has, however, varied between 10 per cent and 35 per cent over the past 541 million years.

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